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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)
's economic relationship with america, and american investors. >> reporter: i'm sylvia hall in washington- still ahead, u.s. borrowers owe more than $1 trillion in student loan debt. so could helping them pay it down be a $1 trillion industry? i'll introduce you to some entrepreneurs who think so. >> susie: besides the fiscal cliff, investors and traders on wall street were talking about some merger news today. leucadia national is buying jefferies group. it already owns 28% of the investment firm. the $3.6 billion deal, could help jeffees sh to the lucrative mergers advisory business. leucadia is a conglomerate with a wide range of businesses from beef processing to timber. also today, sherwin williams is buying consorcio comex, it's a mexican coatings business. the price: $2.3 billion. >> susie: the united states will be the top oil producer in the world by the year 2020, surpassing saudi arabia, and russia. that's the bold call today from the international energy agency. fueling that energy renaissance: a boost in oil and shale gas because of new technologies like fracking. the group a
.e. and bank of america. it all leads up to friday when the president sits down with congressional leaders at the white house to begin the real negotiations, and both sides enter those talks claiming a mandate to protect the principals the voters endorsed at the ballot box. >> darren gersh is with us tonight from our washington, d.c. bureau, where a week after election day here. was there any progress made by the staffs of the political players during the campaign season? where do we stand? >> the staff is always looking at this as a giant chess game and trying to figure out how they can give their bosses their best move, so the staff have been working. we had a lot of commissions and a lot of efforts to try to solve the budget problems. there is a lot of work de behind the scenes and on paper. a deal could come together pretty quickly. the problem is the principals, the leaders, the people who were elected, they have to come back and decide what they're going to do. they're talking about getting an agreement, but nobody knows how to get that agreement right now. >> tom: it pays to parse l
of getting power turned back on, and the challenge of getting around america's busiest city. >> tom: october marked a pick-up in private hiring. that's the word from payroll processing firm adp. it says u.s. private payrolls grew by 158,000 positions in october. that higher than expected number comes as adp overhauls how it calculates the number by including more companies in its survey. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the economic signals out today point in the same direction-- an economy that has moved through a rough couple of months last spring has now found stability. >> slow growth need not be fragile, so we are in a moderate growth phase that appears to be quite durable. it's going to be hard to break out significantly in one direction or the other, unless we get a policy surprise or a policy mistake. >> reporter: the adp payroll snapshot is seen as a kind of preview for the government's official employment report, which comes out tomorrow. factoring in job losses in state and local government, adp projects the labor department will likely say the economy created roughly 130,000 jo
, but still latin america, but they have different ideas about how to deal with the imgriggs issue. governor romney and the self deportation situation has not necessarily found a significant audience even in south florida. nonetheless as the latest poll shows, he has been gaining some strength with voters in north and central florida. >> susan: thanks, tom. we'll catch up with you later in the program. virginia is another crucial state, and will be one of the first swing states to tally election results tonight. polls close at 7:00 p.m. eastern time, and the race looks close, a mirror of the national race. darren gersh joins us from virginia. darren. >> reporter: susie, we're here in woodbridge, virginia, which is considered a swing area in a key swing state. and it's a state that also surprised the candidates this election. after the voting here is over, you'll be hearing a lot more about the fiscal cliff, those automatic spending cuts and tax increases scheduled to take effect on january 1. you'd think the fiscal cliff would be a huge issue here. virginia depends heavily on defense spendin
together with a reinvigorated president to solve america's fiscal problems. and some predict that spirit of cooperation will help lift stocks higher again. >> what i encourage investors to realize however is that an agreement at some point in time is more likely than not and as a result of that you're probably going to see a relief on the other end, the last thing you want to do right now is time the market. >> reporter: here's one hopeful tidbit that might have been lost in all the recent political rhetoric. the stock market is far better off today than it was four years ago. in fact the dow gaining about 60% since president obama's took office in january 2009. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: in washington today, a lot of talk about the need to get an agreement on the fiscal cliff, and to reach a bi- partisan solution. but as darren gersh reports, both sides are still trying to figure out the message of the election, and may be reluctant to compromise for now. >> reporter: the voters have spoken and house speaker john boehner says he has gotten the message. >> because the a
. >> we're in small town america. and it's not like we're in the beltway where if you lose this job, you can go to another job. there's another opportunity, you don't have that here. so anyone in the defense industry that's in small town america, is going to have a huge impact. >> reporter: so while all these cuts are one way to help washington get its fiscal house in order, c.e.o. bill polacek says it would take a massive, preventable and personal toll here in johnstown. >> everything i've worked for, everything everybody worked for, in 25 years of business that we're celebrating this year, could all be for naught, only because the people in congress, and the senate, can't vote to do what's in the best interest of the american people. >> reporter: congress has until january first to avert the sequester. until then, manufacturers, researchers, teachers and a host of others will be waiting to find out if and how the fiscal cliff will affect them. sylvia hall, "n.b.r.," washington. >> tom: we've seen the estimates on going over the cliff, recession, some even calling it debt-mageddon. but
states of america pays its bills and does not default for the first time in its history, is deeply irresponsible. >> reporter: at least talks are going on. the speaker and the president spoke by phone for almost half an hour last night. but a first negotiating round between treasury secretary timothy geithner and congressional leaders did nothing to improve the tone on capitol hill. democrats said the ball was in the speaker's court. >> we're saying, extend the tax cuts for the middle class as part of that. we know if we do nothing, the top rates go up. we're waiting for the republicans to come forward with something. that's our proposal, period. >> reporter: no one in washington ever thought negotiations to get past the fiscal cliff would be easy. now, more and more are talking about a rerun of what happened with the tarp bailout bill. first, congress may have to deadlock and go over the cliff, and then count on a falling market and an angry public to force action. >> it's what's euphemistically bng called "let's let the peasants storm the castle with pitchforks" strategy. that is
business grow in asia and south america, even as earnings were down last quarter in the u.s., and it lost money in europe. the bottom line for g.m. in the third quarter was stronger than anticipated. earnings per share totaled 93 cents, well above the0 cents per shares expected. g.m. returned to profitability in south america and china profit jumped 10%. shares jumped 9.5% as volume tripled. g.m. hopes to stop losing money in europe by the middle of the decade. yesterday, ford told us it expects its european business to begin turning around in about a year. today, ford shares were also on the move after its strong0 earnings report during the market closure. ford rallied 8.2%. over $11 per share for the first time since may. some merger action in the clothes and fashion industry hit the tape with p.v.h. buying warnaco group, that's the company licensing lvin kleinle speedo and other brands. warnco stock shot up almost 39%. the deal totals $2.8 billion in cash and stock. the buyer, p.v.h., rose 20% as a big sign of market confidence in the deal. and u.s. vitamin maker schiff nutrition has a
're scared about america's fiscal cliff, as well as europe's financial crisis. but market pros say, seasonally, this is a great time to wade back in. >> november, december, january is the best three-month period in the stock market. these are your best gains, historically. so if we don't see investors' demand coming in soon, when's it going to happen? >> reporter: others say it's going to happen when investors get the message about the importance of equities in their portfolio. >> to get them back into the market over the next 12 to 24 months, we think lots of educati, but from different kinds of people-- you're advisor, if you have one. if you don't have an advisor, it would be good to hear that message from your employer. >> reporter: financial planners believe once the fiscal cliff problem is solved, we'll probably get a relief rally in the stock market. they predict that run-up will be a magnet for reluctant retail investors. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: to learn more about investors and presidential elections, head to nbr.com. there you'll find more on historical chan
to fill a total of 24 million seats between today and sunday, according to airlines for america. that's an average of 2.5 million seats filled each day, up by a quarter of a million from last year. >> this year so far, the average profit point for every passenger is about $.50, which is awfully small. last year it was $.77. >> reporter: the holiday season is a welcome event in the industry's fourth quarter. >> historically, the fourth quarter was at best a break even quarter, but due to the airlines better management of their seat inventory, they can actually produce a profit during the fourth quarter, which i'm expecting. >> reporter: in recent years, industry representatives say airlines have struggled to survive, as their ticket sales failed to cover the volatile cost of fuel and their increased regulatory and tax burdens. to combat the problem, they have started selling fewer tickets to keep capacity down and control costs. >> we're finding that more people still want to fly and unfortunately it means that planes are going to be a little more full than we'd like them to be but at
america president mark reuss at the los angeles auto show. g.m. unveiled its first all- electric plug-in at the show, and, as diane eastabrook tonight, the company hopes the spark can give the electric vehicle business the jolt it needs. >> reporter: the chevrolet spark e.v. will hit showrooms in california and oregon next summer. engineers are still testing the pure plug-in so general motors can't say yet how many miles the sub-compact will get on a single charge. what it can say is new technology will allow for faster charging. the spark won't be cheap. with tax incentives, the car's sticker price will be about $25,000, double the price of the gas-powered version. >> when you look at the functionality that this vehicle has and the range we offer-- which we believe is the top of its segment-- it is going to be extremely competitive from a price perspective. you're always going to pay more for an electric vehicle than you would for a traditional vehicle with a gas engine. >> reporter: general motors has placed a huge bet on electric vehicles, hoping they'll help the company reach the
hundreds of companies lending a helping hand to the victims of superstorm sandy. corporate america has pledged over $50 million. the big bank is offering $5 million in loans to affected small businesses and donating to the american red cross. other household names giving include coca-cola, delta airlines, disney, home depot, lowe's, the nfl and target. from fuel to cash to communications. verizon communications warned today hurricane sandy could wreak havoc on its fourth quarter earnings. the wireless, phone and internet provider took on major damage in the storm. four of its facilities in new york flooded. as sylvia hall reports, verizon's warning is a sign of the damage felt by the tele- communications industry. >> reporter: just like with other telecom companies, verizon employees are working hard to restore service to the northeast. but it's not easy when they're also pumping water out of the basements of their flooded new york facilities, which are running on generator power. the company announced today that sandy's aftermath will likely extend to fourth quarter earnings. analysts
's their expertise but they have to figure out the details and we need to resolve this subject and give america confidence that our political leaders can work together and i honestly believe that that will happen. >> reporter: when you reported third quarter results earlier this month you said you didn't have enough clarity on the impact of superstorm sandy. do you have more clarity now? >> i do have clarity on sandy and frankly it's devastating. particularly on individuals. we had 200 of our stores closed for the first three days of the november period and then many more were closed after that because we didn't have power. we definitely were impacted in a major way at our company. >> reporter: for the current quarter you expect to fall short of wall street forecasts by at least five cents. are you still comfortable with those expectations? >> we try to guide honestly and if we're able to exceed that number that's always good news. but we try to guide where we believe we're going to be so we're confident with our forecasts. >> reporter: terry thank you so much. >> thanks ruben. >> tom: while ma
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 63 (some duplicates have been removed)